Envisioning Transformation:
A Two-Day Academic Symposium

At this academic symposium, “Envisioning Transformation,” we honor the impact and legacy of the 1965 Watts Rebellion by exploring and examining how communities can create futures of social justice and harmony, with dynamism that fosters coalitions, economic successes, and transformation in Los Angeles, the nation, and our world.

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Lunch will be provided with Symposium registration. Reserve free tickets on the Symposium registration site.


DAY 1: MARCH 22, 2016


8:00 AM  |  ON-SITE REGISTRATION  |  LOKER STUDENT UNION, 2ND FLOOR


8:30 AM  |  SESSION I  |  LOKER STUDENT UNION BALLROOM

BREATHE, BABY, BREATHE: FREEDOM FROM THE LIE OF BLACK INFERIORITY

Dr. Cheryl Tawede Grills
Professor of Psychology
Loyola Marymount University

Dr. Grills’ work as a community psychologist addresses mental health concerns and healing from generations of inequality, inequities, and traumatic experiences both individually and collectively.

For faculty and students:
Dr. Grills has provided a very recent scholarly paper, to be published this spring: Breathe, Baby, Breathe. Grills identifies her thesis this way:

To promote racial justice in policing in the United States, the Black community must address the root cause of racial injustice—the lie of Black inferiority, its psychological impact on people within and outside of the Black community, and the requisite need for a movement for emotional emancipation--freedom from the lie. Only in this way can Black people free themselves from the deadly stereotypes grounded in the lie--stereotypes that have burdened them and shaped the world’s perceptions of them for centuries.

Dr. Grills’ paper is available on request (pdf) from Keith Boyum at: kboyum@csudh.edu


10:00 AM  |  SESSION II  |  LOKER STUDENT UNION BALLROOM

SPACES OF CONFLICT, SOUNDS OF SOLIDARITY: MUSIC, RACE AND SPATIAL ENTITLEMENT
        
Dr. Gaye Theresa Johnson
Associate Professor of African American Studies and Chicana/o Studies
University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Johnson’s work has focused on civil rights and spatial struggles among Black and Brown freedom seekers in Los Angeles.  Johnson offers a rich and nuanced account of the shared struggles and victories of Black and Brown communities in Los Angeles.  She is also working on a book titled These Walls Will Fall: Protest at the Intersection of Immigrant Detention and Mass Incarceration.

For faculty and students: Reviews of Dr. Johnson’s first book are found at these links:


12:00 NOON  |  LOKER STUDENT UNION BALLROOM

LUNCH


1:00 PM  |  SESSION III  |  UNIVERSITY THEATRE

(SOUTH) L.A. STORY: DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE, ECONOMIC SHIFTS, AND COMMUNITY FUTURES

Dr. Manuel Pastor
Professor of Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity
University of Southern California

Dr. Pastor is founding director of the Center for Justice, Tolerance, and Community at U.C. Santa Cruz, and currently directs the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) at USC and USC’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII). Dr. Pastor’s research has generally focused on issues of the economic, environmental and social conditions facing low-income urban communities – and the social movements seeking to change those realities.  His most recent book, Equity, Growth, and Community: What the Nation Can Learn from America’s Metro Areas, co-authored with Chris Benner (UC Press 2015), argues that inequality stunts economic growth and how bringing together equity and growth requires concerted local action.

For faculty and students: Reviews of Dr. Pastor’s work are found at these links:


2:30 PM  |  SESSION IV  |  UNIVERSITY THEATRE

UNTANGLING BLACK AND BROWN SOLIDARITY

Dr. Laura Pulido
Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity
University of Southern California

Dr. Pulido researches race, environmental justice, Chicana/o Studies, critical human geography, and Los Angeles. She studies how various groups experience racial and class oppression, how these experiences differ among particular communities of color, and how they mobilize to create a more socially-just world. Asking such questions, Professor Pulido has done extensive work in the field of environmental justice, social movements, labor studies, and radical tourism.

For faculty and students:
Dr. Pulido has provided a scholarly paper: Race, Class and Political Activism: Black, Chicana/o and Japanese-American Leftists in Southern California, 1968-78.

Dr. Pulido’s paper is available on request (pdf) from Keith Boyum at: kboyum@csudh.edu


DAY 2: MARCH 23, 2016


10:00 AM  |  SESSION I  |  LOKER STUDENT UNION BALLROOM

BLACK LIVES MATTER AND THE BUILDING OF A MASS MOVEMENT

Dr. Melina Abdullah
Professor and Chair, Pan-African Studies
California State University, Los Angeles

Dr. Abdullah remarks that a focus on power allocation and societal transformation binds her research together. She is a co-founder and acknowledged leader in the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

For faculty and students:
Dr. Abdullah recommends this as an introduction to her perspectives:


12:00 NOON  |  LOKER STUDENT UNION BALLROOM

LUNCH


1:00 PM  |  WORKSHOP  |  UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SOUTH, FIFTH FLOOR

UNDERSTANDING RACE AND RACISM IN THE SHADOW OF THE WATTS REBELLION

A participatory and interactive workshop facilitated by:

Dr. Corina Benavides-Lopez
Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies
California State University, Dominguez Hills

Dr. Justin Gammage
Department of Africana Studies
California State University, Dominguez Hills

Dr. Carolina San Juan
Department of Asian Pacific Studies
California State University, Dominguez Hills


2:30 PM  |  CLOSING PANEL  |  UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SOUTH, FIFTH FLOOR

Moderator

Dr. Hamoud Salhi
Associate Dean, College of Natural and Behavioral Sciences
California State University, Dominguez Hills

Panelists

Dr. John Davis
Dean, College of Education
California State University, Dominguez Hills


4:00 PM  |  RECEPTION  |  UNIVERSITY LIBRARY CULTURAL ART CENTER, LIB 1940

WATTS NOW: STUDENT EXHIBITION AND WATTS THEN: ARCHIVES EXHIBITION

“Watts Now” Curators:

Ms. Michele Bury
Chair and Professor, Art and Design
California State University, Dominguez Hills

Ms. Ellie Zenhari
Assistant Professor, Art and Design
California State University, Dominguez Hills

Ms. Kathy Zimmerer
Director, University Art Gallery
California State University, Dominguez Hills

“Watts Then” Curator:

Mr. Gregory L. Williams
Director, Archives and Special Collections
University Library
California State University, Dominguez Hills

Reading and Q&A Session with Special Guest:

Mr. Odie Hawkins
Original member of the Watts’ Writers Workshop

Mr. Hawkins is one of the original members of the Watts Writers Workshop and Open Door program created by the Writers Guild of America, West.  He is the author of 14 novels, as well as poetry, and film, television and radio scripts. Hawkins has been an instructor and visiting lecturer at several schools, including the 111th Street School, Locke High School and Fremont High School and is presently facilitating a writers group at the A. C. Bilbrew Branch of the Los Angeles Library.