2016 Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act Annual Report

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2016 Annual Security Report

 ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT     

  • Fire Safety and Statistics
  • Crime Log

 CAMPUS FACILITIES     

  • Security Access
  • Maintenance of Campus Facilities 

UNIVERSITY POLICE AUTHORITY AND JURISDICTION 

CAMPUS SECURITY AND CRIME PREVENTION 

  • Working with Local Law Enforcement
  • Safety and Security in Student Housing
  • Timely Warning Notice
  • Emergency Notifications
  • Student Safety Patrol
  • Reporting a Crime
  • Confidential Reporting
  • Campus Security Authority (CSA) Reporting
  • Security Awareness Programs for Students and Employees

 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS – POLICY 

  • Shelter in place-What it means to Shelter in Place
  • General Evacuation Procedures
  • Emergency Operations Plan 

ALCOHOL, DRUGS, AND WEAPONS - POLICIES 

  • Alcohol
  • Drugs
  • Disciplinary Sanctions for Alcohol and Drugs
  • Resources Alcohol and Drugs
  • Campus Red Folder
  • Weapons 

REPORTING A MISSING STUDENT POLICY 

  • Missing Student Contact Procedures 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

  • Complaint
  • Investigation
  • Timelines
  • Notice of Conference
  • Notice of Hearing
  • Hearing
  • Hearing Standard of Proof; Report and Recommendations
  • Final Decision/Notification
  • Sanctions; Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Acts of Violence
  • Sanctions; Employees
  • Sanctions; Students 

SEXUAL VIOLENCE – POLICY 

  • Definitions
  • Assistance for Victims: Protective Orders
  • How to be an Active Bystander
  • Risk Reduction
  • The Importance of Preserving Evidence
  • Reporting Options and Confidentiality
  • Privileged Confidential Communication
  • Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Counselors and Advocates
  • Reporting to University or Local Police
  • Reporting to Title IX Coordinator and Other University Employees
  • Resources for Reporting - Sexual Assault 

CSU Procedures for Investigating Reports of Sexual Discrimination

CONVICTED SEXUAL OFFENDER REGISTRATION LAWS 

MEGAN’S LAW 

COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES 

EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (EAP) 

HATE CRIMES 

CSUDH GRADUATION RATES

ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT 

The California State University, Dominguez Hills Police Department is committed to assisting all members of the California State University, Dominguez Hills (CSUDH) community in providing for their safety and security. As part of this responsibility, this document has been compiled in compliance with federal law (the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act); the 2008 Revision to the Higher Education Opportunity Act and California Education Code section 67380 which informs members of the community of institutional policies concerning campus security (including University Police law enforcement authority, crime reporting policies, alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, sexual assault and other matters of related importance); and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) which amends the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security and Campus Crime Statistics Act, commonly known as the Clery Act, under the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act provision (i.e., Campus SaVE Act).

This report contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus; in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by California State University, Dominguez Hills; and on public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. This report is available to the CSUDH community both online at http://www4.csudh.edu/dhpd/clery/security-report/index and in person at the University Police station. 

In September of every year, a postcard is mailed to all enrolled students.  The postcard provides the website address to access this report. The website address is also provided on staff and faculty paystubs during the month of September. Copies of the report may also be obtained from the University Police Department at 1000 E. Victoria Street, Carson, CA 90747 (Welch Hall B100) or by calling (310) 243-3639. All prospective employees may obtain a copy by accessing the Human Resources "campus crime statistics" link. In addition the full text of this report is located in the CSUDH class schedule.

The Office Student Affairs annually reports to the University Police all judicial referrals alleging liquor, drug and weapons law violations. Further, the Director of Student Housing ensures that all such violations occurring in on-campus housing are reported to the Office of Student Affairs. The Athletic office also reports judicial referrals alleging liquor, drug and weapons law violations to the Office of Student Affairs.

Fire Safety and Statistics

In accordance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, California State University Dominguez Hills provides mandatory fire safety information as part of this Annual Crime Report. The Annual Fire Safety Report, which contains detailed fire data and policies and procedures for all on-campus student housing facilities, can be found by clicking on Housing Policies, then Fire Safety Statistics at http://www4.csudh.edu/housing/.

All reports of fires and fire alarms are maintained in a database within the California State University Dominguez Hills Police Department. The data collected includes, but is not limited to, the building name; alarm location; time and date; the number and cause of each fire; any and all injuries; any fatalities; and dollar values for property damaged by the fire. The California State University Dominguez Hills Police Department uses the database to maintain a Daily Fire Log that states the nature of the fire, date, time, and general location of each fire in on-campus student housing facilities. The Fire Log, which contains the most recent seven (7) days of information, can be viewed at the University Police Department. The public can also view the last sixty (60) days of crime and fire related incidents upon request.

Crime log

The department maintains publicly available crime statistics which may be accessed at http://www4.csudh.edu/dhpd/clery/crime-stats/index . A daily Crime Log is also maintained and copies are available at the University Police Station.

CAMPUS FACILITIES

California State University, Dominguez Hills is a community of approximately 14,000 students. The campus is located in the city of Carson, County of Los Angeles. The University consists of one main campus located at 1000 East Victoria Street in Carson, California. The California State University, Dominguez Hills housing complex is a gated community and consists of two story apartment buildings, which provide on-campus housing for approximately 600 students. Activity within housing is monitored by University Housing personnel which includes on-site complex coordinators and resident assistants.

Security Access 

The California State University Dominguez Hills Police Department provides 24-hour patrol of university property including academic and administrative buildings, parking lots, and residence halls.SecurityandsafetyconditionsoncampusarecontinuallyevaluatedbymembersofEnvironmentalHealthandSafety, Facilities Services and University Police personnel.

Most campus buildings and facilities are accessible to members of the campus community, guests and visitors, Monday through Saturday until 10 p.m. and as certain special events dictate. The University recognizes that there will be some need for after hour and weekend access to buildings. Anyone working late or on weekends should notify the University Police. Some offices, labs, computer rooms and other areas of campus have alarms. All staff and faculty are encouraged to secure offices and classrooms. Access to university housing apartments is limited to residents, guests, and university staff.

 Maintenance of Campus Facilities

The campus facilities are maintained by Facilities Services. Officers report the need for replacement of lights and any other physical hazards they notice. Lighting improvements are constantly being evaluated. Improvements have included upgrading of lighting in parking lots, in areas with heavy landscaping and trees, and along pathways frequently traveled by students.

Shrubbery, trees and other vegetation on campus are trimmed and maintained on a regular basis with special attention given to walkways. Emergency telephones are located throughout campus, in parking lots and inside elevators. All emergency (red tower) telephones are connected directly to the University Police and are regularly tested and repaired as needed.

Students are encouraged to report any problems with the campus environment directly to Facilities Services, to faculty advisors, coaches, Student Affairs staff, or any campus administrator. 

UNIVERSITY POLICE AUTHORITY AND JURISDICTION

Central to the mission of California State University, Dominguez Hills, is providing a community that fosters teaching and learning. The University Police Department participates in delivering the University mission and strives to create a safe environment conducive to academic excellence.

The University Police provide safety-oriented service to the campus community. Department members are guided by our mission statement: … to provide a safe campus conducive to education for the University’s students, faculty, staff, and visitors.

University Police provide 24 hour-a-day patrol protection of university property, buildings, parking lots and student housing. Campus safety and security are coordinated by the University Police. The University Police Department is located at the front of the campus in Welch Hall B100. The department has a force of 20 sworn officers with full arrest powers. These police officers are graduates of a California Peace Officers Standards Training Academy and undergo continued training to upgrade their skills as well as training designed to meet the needs of the university community. All sworn employees have been trained in first aid, CPR, and AED. University police officers are vested with full law enforcement powers and responsibilities, identical to the local police or sheriff departments in your home community, and are authorized to enforce all regulations on the university campus and an immediate one-mile radius. In some instances police powers extend statewide. University police officers are armed with authorized firearms. They conduct foot and vehicular patrols on campus and in the residence community 24 hours a day. University Police officers also work very closely with the Los Angeles County Sheriff Department and other law enforcement agencies to assist them with incidents involving campus community members that may occur off campus. University police officers are responsible for reporting and investigating crimes, issuing traffic citations and responding to medical emergencies, traffic accidents and fire emergencies, as well as other incidents that require police assistance.

The University Police Department prepares and submits a monthly Uniform Crime Report to the California Department of Justice. The department also enters stolen vehicles and property with serial numbers into the National Crime Information Center, allowing for recovery throughout the United States.

As an active member of the Criminal Justice system, University Police interact and cooperate with other law enforcement agencies. Cases are filed with the Los Angeles County District Attorney Office. Information may also be given to the Office of Student Affairs for appropriate action involving students.

CAMPUS SECURITY AND CRIME PREVENTION

Working with Local Law Enforcement

The University Police work closely with our neighboring police agency, the Los Angeles County Sheriff, Carson Station. It is the policy of the CSUDH Police Department to comply with applicable federal, state and local laws. In keeping with this requirement, a memorandum of agreement (MOA) has been crafted with the Los Angeles County Sheriff, Carson Station to meet the requirements of the Kristen Smart Campus Safety Act of 1998. This law mandates that university police departments enter into written agreements with local law enforcement agencies in order to clarify operational responsibilities for investigation of Part 1 violent crimes occurring on campus. Pursuant to an administrative agreement, the Los Angeles County Sheriff, Carson Station will investigate the following incidents that occur on campus: Officer- Involved-Shooting, Missing Person(s), Homicide, Sex Crimes against children. The University Police constantly networks and works with other units on campus to facilitate students in achieving their academic goals. 

Two investigators are assigned full-time to follow up on crime and incident reports. They are responsible for follow-up investigations, apprehending suspects, recovering property, preparing cases for filing, and making crime prevention recommendations. Cases are filed with the Office of the Los Angeles County District Attorney. Information may also be given to the Office of Student Affairs for internal judicial process involving students. As part of the Student Affairs philosophy, Student Housing along with the University Police, hold crime prevention classes every semester on a variety of topics including personal safety, sexual assault prevention, DUI awareness, and crime prevention issues. These classes are offered in partnership with the Student Housing Safety Committee. Workshops, group presentations and written materials are provided to on-campus housing residents each semester, focusing on community responsibilities and needs within the student living environment. Information on safety and security is provided to students and employees through email, seminars, bulletins, crime alerts, posters, brochures and the university student newspaper.

Safety and Security in Student Housing

The University Police offers a crime prevention program in housing every semester which includes new student orientations, neighborhood watch programs, residential community-wide presentations and educational programs.

All housing staff members undergo comprehensive training each semester for both prevention and response regarding safety and security issues. As part of their responsibility for campus security both student and professional staff participate in lectures and seminars associated with topics such as substance abuse, prevention of sexual assault, and community security. Professional complex coordinators and resident assistants live in student housing and provide 24 hour staff coverage. Staff members provide evening rounds and network with the University Police on a daily basis.

Residents with automobiles may park in lot 5. Residents are required to purchase a semester permit as well as an "R" permit from housing. If a student receives a parking citation and wishes to contest the citation, the student needs to come to the Police Station in Small College and fill out an "administrative review request." The University Police encourages residents to be mindful of apartment security issues and of the rights of their roommates and to notify Student Housing staff and/or the University Police of any unfamiliar faces or unusual incidents within the housing complex.

Timely Warning Notice

The University Police Department will issue a Timely Warning Notice to the campus community as soon as possible to alert the community of potential danger.  When an event or situation arises, either on or off campus, that constitutes an ongoing or continuous threat, a campus wide timely warning will be issued.  The warning will be disseminated through campus email as well as postings on the police website.  A copy of the notice will be sent to University Housing, CAMS and the StubHub Stadium.  Only those details pursuant to the health and safety of the campus community shall be released and the protection of the victim's identity is of the highest concern.

Emergency Notifications

The California State University Dominguez Hills Police Department will respond to all reports of emergencies or dangerous situations on campus. Upon confirmation by University Police representatives of an emergency or dangerous situation involving an imminent threat to the health or safety of students or employees, University Police officials will request and coordinate the response of additional resources, where necessary, and make appropriate notifications. The University will, without delay, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of the Crisis Action Team, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. The Crisis Action Team includes the following members: 

  • Chief of Police (or designee)
  • University President
  • University President, Chief of Staff
  • Vice President, Administration and Finance
  • Emergency Management Preparedness Coordinator
  • Public Information Officer
  • Vice President, Student Affairs
  • Vice President, University Advancement
  • Risk Manager, Environmental Health and Occupational Safety

Specifically, one or more of the Crisis Action Team, assisted by the Chief of police (or designee), will determine the appropriate segment or segments of the campus to receive the notification; determine the content of the notification including recommendations to shelter in place, campus evacuation, or the partial/complete campus closure to all classrooms.

The Blackboard Connect (ToroAlert), emergency notification system is tested at least once each year.

CSU Dominguez Hills has the following measures which may be implemented in case of an emergency: 

  • ToroAlert - Emergency Notification
  • Wireless PA (public address) system for outdoor notification
  • Classroom telephone notification system
  • Emergency information posters in classrooms
  • Campus Hotline (866) 747-8827
  • Campus webpage-emergency info
  • Social media sites
  • Police vehicle Public Address
  • Electronic Billboard – Victoria/Avalon

Student Safety Patrol

The University Police/Parking Department provides a safety escort program. The student safety patrol are CSUDH students who work in the evening hours Monday – Thursday from 6pm – 11pm. The student Safety Patrol personnel provide personal escorts and additional parking lot security, acting as "eyes and ears" for the University Police. The Safety Patrol personnel are available to escort students, faculty, and staff to and from their classrooms, laboratories or offices to campus parking lots, student housing, or any other campus location. To request an escort, call University Police from a campus phone at x3639 or at (310) 243-3639 or stop by the University Police Station in Welch Hall 100. Advance reservations are not taken. Student Assistants are hired to staff the information booths which are located in the front of campus and in parking Lot 4.

Our police officers provide safety escort service when the Student Safety Patrol are not working. Escort service is available all hours of the day and night and is not limited to the 6pm-11pm time frame.

Reporting a Crime

To report a crime or other emergencies:

Contact University Police at (310) 243-3639 or dial 9-1-1 in an emergency, or utilize one of the Blue Light emergency telephones located throughout campus, contact a police officer on patrol.  All crimes or suspicious activity/persons should be reported to the University Police immediately. 

A confidential "We Tip" line is also available at (310) 243-3908. Confidential digital reporting is also available through the University Police website. Crimes should be reported to the University Police for the purpose of making timely warning reports to the community and for disclosure in the annual crime statistics.

The Department will respond by taking the following action(s) as necessary:

• Dispatch a police officer(s) and/or the Los Angeles City Fire Department to the scene of the reported incident

• Investigate the incident

• Take appropriate action(s) to identify, apprehend, and prosecute the person(s) responsible

• Notify or request the assistance of other law enforcement and/or other agencies and university resources when necessary

• Take action(s) and/or make appropriate notifications

Confidential reporting

The University Police Department encourages anyone who is the victim or witness of any crime to promptly report the incident to the police. Victims or witnesses of sexual violence may report certain crimes to the University Police on a voluntary, confidential basis as provided for by California law. Should a victim or witness choose not to file a crime or incident report with the University Police whereby victim and witness personal information is obtained, the victim and/or witness may choose to complete an anonymous Incident Report in which no personal identifying information is documented.

Crimes reported in this manner will not be investigated by the University Police but will be statistically reported to the California Department of Justice, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The purpose of an anonymous report is to comply with the person’s wishes to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to enhance the future safety of the person and others. With such information, the University can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, employees, and visitors; determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant; and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the institution. 

Campus Security Authority Reporting

The University Police collects crime reports from a variety of individuals and organizations that the Clery Act considers to be Campus Security Authorities, or CSAs.  Potential examples of CSAs are professional staff in the Dean of Student’s Office, athletic coaches, and advisors to student organizations.  All CSAs have an obligation to forward information to University Police regarding offenses reported to them.

Crimes reported confidentially to Campus Security Authorities (CSAs) require that CSAs forward the information to University Police and the crime statistic will be included in the Annual Security Report as the University is required by the federal Clery Act to report certain types of crimes (including certain sex offenses) in statistical reports. However, while the University will report the type of incident in the annual crime statistics report known as the Annual Security Report, victim names/identities will not be revealed.

Psychological counselors when acting within the scope of his or her license or certificate are not considered to be a campus security authority and are not required to report crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of crime statistics.  They are encouraged; if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for the inclusion into the annual crime statistics.

Other Resources

Title IX Coordinator – Welch Hall, Room A-340
(310) 243- 2587

Dean of Students – Welch Hall, Room A-410
(310) 243-3784

AVP Human Resources - Welch Hall, Room A-340
(310) 243- 3771

Director of Athletics- South Academic Complex#3 Room-3134
(310) 243-2224

Director of Student Housing- Student Housing BLDG-A
(310) 243-3031

Women’s Resource Center- Small College Complex, Room 148
(310) 243-2486

Security Awareness Programs for Students and Employees

Crime prevention programs are sponsored by various campus organizations throughout the year.  University police facilitate programs for new student, parent, and faculty, orientations, student organizations, as well as community organization. 

Police Members of the University Police are available to provide the following presentations:

  • Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Assault Prevention
  • DUI and Drug Abuse
  • Safety Awareness and Self Defense
  • Theft Prevention
  • CPR & First Aid
  • Operation ID Engraving
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Safety Presentations for the Child Development Center and Infant Toddler Center
  • Orientation Programs for New First Time Freshmen, Parents, and Transfer Students
  • Orientation Programs for International Students
  • Orientation Programs for Housing Residents

Additionally, our Emergency Preparedness Coordinator regularly provides training on surviving an active shooter, earthquake preparedness, and fire safety, bomb threat, hazmat, and other preparedness topics.

The University Police encourages participation in our crime prevention programs and requests the community’s assistance in keeping our campus safe.  To request a specific crime prevention program, please contact the police department at (310) 243-3639.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS - POLICY

The responsibility for a campus emergency management program as required in California State University “Executive Order #1056 "California State University Emergency Management Program" has been delegated to the University Police. The Department is responsible for the implementation and maintenance of an emergency management program on campus and the development and implementation of programs and projects in emergency planning, training, response, and recovery.

The University Police and Emergency Preparedness Coordinator have developed an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) which addresses the planned response to emergency/disaster situations associated with natural disaster, technological incidents and national security emergencies. The EOP is designed to meet State (SEMS) and Federal (NIMS) requirements. Incorporating the principles of the Incident Command System (ICS), the EOP provides emergency responders with procedures, guidelines such as shelter-in-place and evacuation, and methods of documentation to effectively manage emergencies. University departments are responsible for developing Emergency Action Plans as well as Business Continuity plans for their staff and areas of responsibility.

The University conducts exercises each year, which have included table top exercises, functional field exercises, and tests of the emergency notification systems on campus.These tests which maybe announced or unannounced are designed to assess and evaluate the emergency response plans and capabilities of the institution.Evaluations, after action and corrective action reports will include when the tests occurred, whether they were announced or unannounced and an assessment and evaluation of emergency plans and capabilities are completed after each drill.

The University Police supervisors and officers have received training in ICS and responding to critical incidents on campus.  When a serious incident occurs that causes an immediate threat to the campus,the first responders to the scene are usually the University Police and if determined necessary by the Chief of Police or her designee,mutual aid will be provided by the Los Angeles County Sheriff, Carson Station and/or the Los Angeles County FireDepartment.

These agencies will typically work together to respond to and manage the incident. Depending on the nature of the emergency, other CSUDH Departments and other city, state or federal agencies could also be involved in response to the incident.

General information about the emergency response and evacuation procedures for CSUDH is published each year as part of the institutions Annual Security Report and Fire Safety Policies and Statistics Report.

Shelter in Place-What it Means to Shelter in Place 

Sheltering in place provides protection from external hazards, minimizes the chance of injury and/or provides the time necessary to allow for a safe evacuation. This should be done by selecting a small, interior room if possible, with no or as few windows as possible. When authorities issue directives to shelter-in-place, do not walk outdoors, take refuge indoors immediately.

shelter-in-place order may be issued for several reasons:

  • Active shooter
  • Severe weather
  • Hazardous materials
  • Civil Unrest
  • Hostage situation

Or any situation where it is best for you to stay where you are to avoid any outside threat:

• Remain CALM.

• Faculty should recommend to students and others not to leave and to outside.

• If you are in dorm rooms, remain there.

• Select a small interior room with no or few windows as possible.

• Close and lock all windows, exterior doors, and any other openings that lead to the outside.

• Stay away from all windows, doors.

• Plant Operations personnel or trained Crisis Coordinators should shut down all building ventilation fans and air conditioners, when and if appropriate.

• If you are told there is danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains.

• Select interior room(s) above the ground floor, with the fewest windows or air vents.

• Room(s) should have adequate space for everyone to be able to sit down comfortably.

• Avoid overcrowding by selecting several rooms when necessary.

For severe weather and civil unrest:

• Stay inside and move away from windows.

• Close and lock all exterior doors and offices.

• For extreme weather, relocate to lower levels in the building

For external chemical, biological or radiological incidents:

• Stay inside and move to an inner corridor or office.

• Facilities Services personnel or trained campus personnel may shut down all building ventilation fans and air conditioners, when necessary and appropriate.

• Since many chemical agents are heavier than air, and tend to hold close to the ground move to higher levels of the building if possible to reduce the transfer of contaminated air from outside to inside.

• Remain alert for instructions and updates as they become available from the emergency personnel and university administrators.

General Evacuation Procedures

At the sound of a fire alarm or if you are instructed to evacuate, leave your work area immediately and proceed to the nearest exit, and leave the building. If you are the first to recognize a fire situation, activate the alarm, evacuate to a safe location using the nearest exit, and notify University Police by dialing or 9-1-1 or (310) 243-3639.

• Remain Calm • Do NOT use Elevators, Use the Stairs.

• Assist the physically impaired. If he/she unable to exit without using an elevator, secure a safe location near a stairwell, and immediately inform University Police Services or the responding Fire Dept. of the individual's location.

• Proceed to a clear area at least 150 feet from the building. Keep all walkways clear for emergency vehicles.

• Make sure all personnel are out of the building.

• Do not re-enter the building.

Emergency Operations Plan

The campus emergency operations plan in addition to general emergency procedures for a variety of situations is located on the University Police website at http://www4.csudh.edu/dhpd/emergency-operations-plan/index.

As part of the University’s Emergency Evacuation Plan, there are Floor Wardens on each floor of every building on campus. The names of the Floor Wardens are updated annually. Evacuation drills for each building are conducted at minimum once each year. The Floor Wardens assist the University Police Department in evacuating buildings in emergencies and in some cases may help in identifying hazards in the buildings. The campus community is encouraged to cooperate and participate in all drills.

ALCOHOL, DRUGS, AND WEAPONS POLICIES

University Police officers enforce laws regulating the use of alcoholic beverages and underage drinking. CSUDH is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy environment for the campus community. Alcohol and other drugs should not interfere with the University’s educational mission. All CSUDH students, faculty members, staff members, and administrators are subject to local, state and federal laws regarding the unlawful possession, distribution, or use of alcohol or illegal drugs. Presidential Memorandum PM99-04, Section 5 https://www4.csudh.edu/Assets/CSUDH-Sites/PMs/docs/student-affairs/99-04-sec-5.pdf outlines campus policy on alcohol and drugs: The unlawful manufacture, distribution (by either sale or gift), dispensing, possession or use of alcohol or a controlled substance is prohibited anywhere on the campus of California State University, Dominguez Hills. Actions that will be taken against those who violate this prohibition are delineated elsewhere in this policy. For the purpose of this policy the term controlled substance has the meaning given such term in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802) and includes, but is not limited to, marijuana, cocaine, cocaine derivatives, heroin, “crack,” amphetamines, barbiturates, LSD, PCP, and substances typically known as “designer drugs” such as “ecstasy” or “eve.” Possession of paraphernalia associated with the illegal use, possession, or manufacture of a controlled substance is also prohibited. The illicit use of alcohol is also included in this policy.

Alcohol

The purpose of the policy is to regulate the possession and consumption of alcohol on campus by members of the University Community and by recognized university organizations and departments. The privilege of consuming beer or wine is extended with the expectation that these activities are to be held under conditions which complement the orderly operation of the University. Off campus groups and organizations contracting with the University for use of facilities are also subject to these regulations.

The possession, sale, and serving or use of distilled spirits on campus is prohibited at all times except within the privacy of individual living units in University Housing. The possession, sale, serving or use of beer or wine on campus is also prohibited at all times, except as allowed under the alcoholic beverage license managed by the CSUDH Foundation Campus Dining Services or within the privacy of individual living units in University Housing.

Excessive use of alcohol and other drugs is a serious health problem in itself, but alcohol and drug abuse can also contribute to a host of other physical and mental health problems such as unwanted pregnancy, violent behavior, HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases and psychological depression.

The use of alcoholic beverages must be in compliance with California State Law and is strictly limited to persons 21 years of age or older. The possession, transportation, and/or consumption of alcohol by individuals under 21 years of age is strictly prohibited. Students who are 21 or older may consume alcohol within the privacy of their own room or apartment and without the presence of a minor. In such cases, the doors must be closed and all other policies governing noise and other common courtesies must be followed. No one, regardless of age, may have an open container of alcohol in a public area including grounds and parking lots at any time. No kegs or other communal sources of alcohol are permitted in or around University Housing. It is not appropriate within any Housing facility to plan, host or attend any group event or activity, which includes alcohol use. The ability to exercise care for one’s safety or the safety of others due in whole or part to alcohol consumption is considered a violation of policy. University Housing residents are responsible for their own actions as well as the actions of their guest(s).

University Housing residents are given a University Housing Handbook and are responsible for the information contained within that handbook. This handbook is available at the "A" building in University Housing.

Drugs

The University Police strictly enforce Federal and State laws, as well as the University’s zero-tolerance policy, for the use and sale of illegal drugs. Violators are subject to university discipline, criminal prosecution and removal from University housing. Students found in violation of University alcohol, drug and weapons policies may be subject to academic probation, suspension or expulsion. Parents or guardians may be notified about any disciplinary violation involving alcohol or a controlled substance which has been committed by a student who is under the age of 18. Employees found in violation are subject to disciplinary sanctions up to and including termination. Federal law, state law and University policy prohibit the solicitation, procurement, sale or manufacture of narcotics or controlled substances except as expressly permitted by law. Any student known to be possessing, using, or distributing drugs is subject to serious University disciplinary action and arrest under federal and state laws. Students suspected of using drugs (because of odor, disruptive behavior or by information brought to the attention of staff) will be documented and subject to a disciplinary action.

Disciplinary Sanctions for Alcohol and Drugs

In addition to legal sanctions, students who violate University policies on alcohol and drugs are in violation of the Student Conduct Code and may be subject to discipline pursuant to Executive Order 1098, http://www.calstate.edu/eo/EO-1098.html. While a minor first infraction may result in a warning, subsequent infractions will result in substantial sanctions up to and including expulsion.

While students possessing legally prescribed marijuana may be free from criminal prosecution under California law, they are, nonetheless, required to adhere to the Student Conduct Code. Students who are in possession of legally prescribed cannabis are not exempt from the University’s prohibition against the manufacture, possession, or use of marijuana on campus, or off campus while on university business or participating in University sponsored functions.

Residents living on campus in residential facilities are subject to community standards of conduct. Repeated violation of alcohol and other drug policies in residential facilities constitute a breach of the housing lease, which could result in the imposition of various sanctions, up to and including the cancellation of the lease agreement.

Student athletes are subject to strict prohibitions against the unauthorized use of alcohol and other drugs while on or off-campus and in any way that influences performance or preparations therefore. Violation of the policies and standards of student conduct as issued by the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics constitutes grounds for disciplinary action as determined by the Department, up to and including the termination of status as an athlete. For further information about the rules of student conduct, contact the Director of Intercollegiate Athletics.

Employees who violate University policies on alcohol and other drugs shall be subject to warning or discipline, up to and including termination, in accordance with the processes administered by the Office of Human Resource Services or the Office of Faculty Affairs.

Resources – Alcohol and Drugs

Campus Life Policies may be found on the Student Affairs website under the section on Rights and Responsibilities. These policies are also published in the "Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook" by the Office of Student Development. The Campus Life Policies includes policies on possession and consumption of alcohol, amplified sound, anti-hazing, campus events, alcohol and substance abuse, campus smoking, casino night, dance policies and procedures, free drawing, free speech area, gambling, outdoor programming, posting policy, and unsupervised minors.

The University has established programs that serve to raise the level of safety awareness on the campus community. These programs include: 

  • New Student Orientation Program (Each Semester)
  • Resident Advisors Training Program (Each Semester)
  • Residence Hall Meetings
  • Alcohol and drug abuse programs (Drug awareness and DUI prevention)
  • On-Line Intervention Tools: Info available through Police and Residential Life
  • Disciplinary Probation;

Employee Assistance Program (EAP): Whether the source of the problem is psychological, chemical, marital, family or workplace related, this service puts an employee or their dependents in touch with a skilled counselor who has training and experience in helping people. Counseling may range from a no-cost support group to private counseling. When assistance is requested, no information is reported to supervisors, deans, chairs, or the Human Resources Department. 

  • Student Health and Psychological Services
    SHC A141
    310-243-3625

  • Student Development
    SCC C128
    310-243-3818

  • HHRC/Integrated Insights
    1-800-342-8111

Campus Red Folder

The California State University System has implemented the Red Folder Initiative which provides a protocol for faculty and staff members who notice or engage in contact with a student showing signs of distress or otherwise destructive behavior. The Red Folder has been installed into every staff campus computer, allowing for quick searchers based on the student’s behavior.

Weapons

Firearms and other dangerous weapons of any kind (including fireworks, stun guns, knives with a fixed blade, nunchucks, paint pellet guns, any device which closely resembles a firearm such as BB guns, air pellet guns, slingshots, explosives, spear guns, bows and arrows) are not permitted on campus or in the Student Housing complex. Use, possession, or sale of firearms or any other dangerous weapon is strictly prohibited on campus by State law and is punishable as a felony, refer to Penal Code Section 626.9 (h).

REPORTING A MISSING STUDENT – POLICY

It is the policy of the University police to immediately respond and conduct a preliminary investigation regarding any reports of missing persons, both adult and juvenile. Explicit reporting and investigative procedures regarding missing persons are contained in the University Police Policy Manual, Section 332.1.

The term "missing student" is defined as any California State University Dominguez Hills student residing in an on-campus student housing facility who is reported missing from his or her residence. Reports of missing students should be made to representatives of any of the following: the University Police Department (call 310-243-3639); the Division of Student Affairs (call 310-243-3784); or the University Housing Services (call 310-243-2228). If a student is reported missing to a University representative from other than the University Police Department, that representative will immediately notify University Police. Whenever a California State University Dominguez Hills student is believed missing, the University will initiate steps to locate him or her or to determine why the student has not been seen. Students are under no obligation to notify the University of plans to spend time away from their residences; however, if circumstances indicate that an investigation is warranted, concerned parties should contact the University Police Department. Upon notification, the University Police Department will make inquiries within the University and, if need be, outside the University setting. If the University determines that the circumstances of the missing student require a police investigation, the University Police Department will conduct a preliminary investigation and notify the local law enforcement agency (Los Angeles County Sherriff Department, Carson). If the Sheriff Department determines that the student should be classified as a missing person, they will take the lead in conducting a joint investigation; per the Administrative Agreement between the State University Police Department and the Los Angeles County Sheriff Department dated August 15, 2012. The University will support their investigation by providing whatever technical support is appropriate, including notices, photos, schedules, and any other information relevant to the search for the missing student.

Missing Student Contact Procedures

All students residing in on-campus student housing facilities have the option of identifying a contact person or persons whom the University will notify if the student is determined to be missing by the University Police Department or the local law enforcement agency (Los Angeles County Sheriff Department). The contact information will be confidential, accessible only to authorized campus officials and law enforcement, and may not be disclosed except in a missing person investigation. When a student who resides in an on-campus student housing facility is determined to have been missing for 24 hours, the University will:

• Notify the contact person if the student has designated one, within 24 hours;

• Notify the student’s custodial parent or guardian and/or any other designated contact person within 24 hours if the student is under 18 years of age and is not emancipated; and

• Inform the local law enforcement agency (University Police Department) that has jurisdiction in the area that the student is missing within 24 hours.

Students may go online at http://www.csudh.edu/studentaffairs/housing/policies-missing-persons.shtmlfor further information on how to designate a contact person in the event of an emergency.

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Complaint. Whenever it appears that the Student Conduct Code has been violated, an oral or written complaint should be directed to the student conduct administrator as soon as possible after the event takes place. 

Investigation. The student conduct administrator shall promptly: investigate each complaint submitted; determine whether it is appropriate to charge a Student with violation of the Student Conduct Code; and consider whether the University should implement an interim suspension, withdrawal of consent to remain on Campus, no contact orders concerning one or more members of the University community, or other Interim Remedies for the protection of any Complainant/victim or witnesses.

Timelines. Investigations shall be concluded within 60 Working Days after a complaint has been made.

Complaints by Students alleging Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking against other Students shall be filed and investigated according to the procedures set forth in Executive Order 1097 http://www.calstate.edu/EO/EO-1097.html The Title IX Coordinator shall notify the student conduct administrator of the status of any such complaint or appeal to the Chancellor's Office, as well as the investigation results (including findings and any Interim Remedies afforded to the Complainant/victim), so that the student conduct administrator may determine whether to initiate student conduct proceedings.

Complaints by CSU employees or Third Parties, as defined in Executive Order 1096 (e.g., vendors, auxiliary employees or Campus visitors), alleging Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking against Students shall be filed and investigated according to the procedures set forth in Executive Order 1096 http://www.calstate.edu/EO/EO-1096.html. The Title IX Coordinator shall notify the student conduct administrator of the status of any such complaint or appeal to the Chancellor's Office, as well as the investigation results (including findings and any Interim Remedies afforded to the Complainant/victim), so that the student conduct administrator may determine whether to initiate student conduct proceedings.

Notice of Conference 

Within 10 Working Days after the student conduct administrator receives the Investigator's findings, the student conduct administrator shall notify the Student in writing that a conference has been scheduled or that the Student is directed to promptly schedule a conference with the student conduct administrator. 

In cases involving allegations of Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking, the student conduct administrator shall offer the Complainant/victim the opportunity to meet with the student conduct administrator separately, prior to the conference. The conference and any meetings with the Complainant/victim shall occur within 20 Working Days after the student conduct administrator receives the report and findings pursuant to Executive Order 1098. 

The student conduct administrator shall promptly notify the Title IX Coordinator of the outcome of the conference with the Student charged. If the case does not proceed to hearing, the Title IX Coordinator shall at that time:

• Notify the Complainant/victim of the outcome of the conference, including any sanction that relates directly to the Complainant. Victims of crimes of violence, including sex offenses, shall also receive notice.

• Take any appropriate further steps to address the effects of any hostile environment resulting from the Discrimination, Harassment or Retaliation.

• Identify and address any remaining systemic or other patterns of Discrimination, Harassment or Retaliation at the Campus.

Notice of Hearing

The student conduct administrator shall issue a notice of hearing promptly after the conference. In cases involving allegations of Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking, notice shall also be provided to the Complainant and the DHR Administrator or the Title IX Coordinator. The notice of hearing shall be issued within five Working Days after the conference has concluded.

Hearing

The hearing is closed to all persons except the student conduct administrator; the Student charged; the Complainant/victim in cases of Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking; their respective advisors; appropriate witnesses while they are testifying; a support person to accompany alleged victims of Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking while they are testifying; the hearing officer; and one person to assist the hearing officer in recording the hearing. The Student charged, any Complainant, and any witnesses shall attend the hearing in person unless the student conduct administrator permits an exception (e.g., participation via videoconference or telephone). A police or security officer may also be present if deemed appropriate or necessary by the vice president for Student Affairs or hearing officer. The University will cooperate in providing University witnesses wherever possible, provided that they are identified at least five Working Days before the hearing.

Hearing Standard of Proof; Report Recommendations 

After the hearing, the hearing officer shall make findings of fact and conclusions about whether the Student charged violated the Student Conduct Code. The standard of proof the hearing officer shall use is whether the University's charge is sustained by a preponderance of the evidence. It is the University's burden to show that it is "more likely than not" that the Student violated the Student Conduct Code.

The hearing officer shall submit a written report of findings and conclusions to the president, along with any recommended sanctions, recommendations regarding restricting the Student's contact with, or physical proximity to, the Complainant or other persons. The report shall be submitted within 10 Working Days after the hearing.

Both the accuser and the accused must be informed of the outcome of any institutional disciplinary proceeding that is brought alleging a sex offense

Final Decision/Notification:

Executive Order 1098 provides that “the president shall review the hearing officer's report and issue a final decision.”

The president may impose the recommended sanctions, adopt a different sanction or sanctions, reject sanctions altogether, or refer the matter back for further findings on specified issues. If the president adopts a different sanction than what is recommended by the hearing officer, the president must set forth the reasons in the final decision letter. The president's final decision letter shall be issued within 10 Working Days after receipt of the hearing officer's report.

The president shall send his or her decision electronically to the Student charged at the University-assigned or other primary e-mail address linked to the Student's University account.

In cases involving crimes of violence (as the term is defined in Section 16 Title 18, United States Code), including Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking, both the Complainant-victim and the Student charged shall be simultaneously informed in writing of:

• The outcome of any disciplinary proceedings that arise from such allegations;

• Any change to the results that occurs prior to the time that such results become final; and

• When such results become final.

This information is given only to the Student charged and Complainant-victim, and includes the name of the Student charged, any violation found to have been committed, and any sanctions imposed on the Student charged. The University may also notify any other alleged victim of the final results regardless of whether or not the charges are sustained. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of such crime or offense, the next of kin of such victim will be treated as the alleged victim for purposes of this paragraph.

Compliance with this paragraph does not constitute a violation of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). For the purpose of this paragraph, the outcome of a disciplinary proceeding means only the institution’s final determination with respect to the alleged sex offense and any sanction that is imposed against the accused.

Sanctions-Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Acts of Sexual Violence

Individuals alleged to have committed Sexual Violence may face criminal prosecution by law enforcement and may incur penalties as a result of civil litigation. In addition, employees and students may face discipline/sanctions at the University. Employees may face sanctions up to and including dismissal from employment, per established CSU policies and provisions of applicable collective bargaining agreements. Students and employees charged with Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment or Sexual Violence will also be subject to discipline, pursuant University policies, and will be subject to appropriate sanctions.”

Possible sanctions for employees:

Sanctions up to and including dismissal from employment may be imposed in accordance with current collective bargaining agreement, if applicable. Possible sanctions for students: Under Executive Order 1098 the following possible sanctions may be imposed for violations of the student conduct code:

• Restitution;

• Loss of Financial Aid;

• Educational and Remedial Sanctions;

• Denial of Access to Campus or Persons;

• Disciplinary Probation;

• Suspension;

• Expulsion;

• Multiple Sanctions;

• Administrative Hold and Withholding a Degree;

• Interim Suspension: A president may impose an interim suspension pursuant to 5 Cal. Code Regs. § 41302 where there is reasonable cause to believe that separation of a Student is necessary to protect the personal safety of persons within the University community or University Property, and to ensure the maintenance of order. Violation of any condition of interim suspension shall be grounds for expulsion. For further information, contact the Vice-President for Student Affairs Office by calling 310-243-3784.

SEXUAL VIOLENCE - POLICY

The California State University, Dominguez Hills does not discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, or sexual orientation in its education programs or activities. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and certain other federal and state laws, prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, gender, or sexual orientation in employment, as well as all education programs and activities operated by the University (both on and off campus), and protect all people regardless of their gender or gender identity from sex discrimination, which includes sexual harassment and sexual violence. CSU Executive Order 1095- http://www.calstate.edu/eo/EO-1095.html

As a result, California State University, Dominguez Hills issues this statement of policy to inform the community of our comprehensive plan addressing sexual misconduct, educational programs, and procedures that address sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, whether the incident occurs on or off campus and when it is reported to a University official. In this context, California State University, Dominguez Hills prohibits the offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking and reaffirms its commitment to maintain a campus environment emphasizing the dignity and worth of all members of the university community. For a complete copy of California State University system policy governing sexual misconduct, visit http://www.calstate.edu/eo/EO-1095.html.

The University has established a Coordinated Community Response Team. The team consists of members from Student Affairs, Human Resources, Police Services, Judicial Affairs; the Title IX Coordinator, the campus Clery Compliance Officer, campus Housing, and the Woman’s Resource Center. The team meets on an as needed basis for developing, reviewing, and revising protocols, policies and procedures for addressing violence against men and women on campus.

Definitions

Sex Discrimination means an adverse action taken against an individual because of gender or sex (including sexual harassment, sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking) as prohibited by Title IX; Title IV; VAWA/Campus SaVE Act; California Education Code § 66250 et seq.; and/or California Government Code § 11135. See also Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (Cal. Govt. Code § 12940 et seq.), and other applicable laws. Both men and women can be victims of Sex Discrimination. 

Sexual Harassment, a form of Sex Discrimination, is unwelcome verbal, nonverbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that includes, but is not limited to sexual violence, sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and indecent exposure, where:

• Submission to, or rejection of, the conduct is explicitly or implicitly used as the basis for any decision affecting a student’s academic status or progress, or access to benefits and services, honors, programs, or activities available at or through the University; or

• Such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive that its effect, whether or not intended, could be considered by a reasonable person in the shoes of the student, and is in fact considered by the student, as limiting the student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities or opportunities offered by the University; or

• Submission to, or rejection of, the conduct by a University employee is explicitly or implicitly used as the basis for any decision affecting a term or condition of employment, or an employment decision or action; or

• Such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive that its effect, whether or not intended, could be considered by a reasonable person in the shoes of the University employee or third party, and is in fact considered by the University employee or third party, as intimidating, hostile or offensive.

Sexual Harassment also includes acts of verbal, non-verbal or physical aggression, intimidation or hostility based on gender or sex-stereotyping, even if those acts do not involve conduct of a sexual nature.

Sexual Violence is a form of Sexual Harassment and means physical sexual acts, such as unwelcome sexual touching, sexual assault, sexual battery, rape, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking (when based on gender or sex), perpetrated against an individual against his or her will and without consent or against an individual who is incapable of giving consent due to that individual's use of drugs or alcohol, status as a minor, or disability. Sexual Violence may include physical force, violence, threat, or intimidation, ignoring the objections of the other person, causing the other person’s intoxication or incapacitation through the use of drugs or alcohol, or taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation (including voluntary intoxication).

Men as well as women can be victims of these forms of Sexual Violence. Unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor (statutory rape) occurs even if the intercourse is consensual when the victim is under 18 years old, because the victim is considered incapable of giving legal consent due to age.

Sexual Assault is a form of Sexual Violence and is an attempt, coupled with the ability, to commit a violent injury on the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex.

Sexual Battery is a form of Sexual Violence and is any willful and unlawful use of force or violence upon the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex.

Rape is a form of Sexual Violence, and is non-consensual sexual intercourse that may also involve the use of threat of force, violence, or immediate and unlawful bodily injury or threats of future retaliation and duress. Any sexual penetration, however slight, is sufficient to constitute rape. Sexual acts including intercourse are considered non-consensual when the person is incapable of giving consent because s/he is incapacitated from alcohol and/or drugs, is under 18 years old, or if a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability renders the person incapable of giving consent. The accused’s relationship to the person (such as family member, spouse, friend, acquaintance or stranger) is irrelevant. (See complete definition of Consent below.)  

Acquaintance Rape is a form of Sexual Violence committed by an individual known to the victim. This includes a person the victim may have just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website. (See above for definition of Rape.)

Consent means an informed, affirmative, conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.

• Consent must be voluntary, and given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. Consent requires positive cooperation in a particular sexual act, or expression of intent to engage in that sexual act through the exercise of free will.

• Consent can be withdrawn or revoked. Consent to one form of sexual activity (or one sexual act) does not constitute consent to other forms of sexual activity (or other sexual acts). Consent to sexual activity given on one occasion does not constitute consent to sexual activity on another occasion. The fact that two people are or were in a dating or sexual relationship does not constitute consent to engage in sexual activity. There must always be mutual and affirmative consent to engage in sexual activity. Consent to a sexual act may be withdrawn or revoked at any time, including after penetration. The victim’s request for the perpetrator to use a condom or birth control does not, in and of itself, constitute consent. Once consent is withdrawn or revoked, the sexual activity must stop immediately.

• Consent cannot be given by a person who is incapacitated. For example, a person cannot give consent if s/he is unconscious or coming in and out of consciousness. A person is incapacitated if s/he lacks the physical and/or mental ability to make informed, rational judgments. Examples of incapacitation include unconsciousness, sleep and blackouts. Whether an intoxicated person (as a result of using alcohol or other drugs) is incapacitated depends on the extent to which the alcohol or other drugs impact the person’s decision-making capacity, awareness of consequences, and ability to make fully informed judgments. A person with a medical or mental disability may also lack the capacity to give consent.

• Being intoxicated by drugs or alcohol does not diminish a person’s responsibility to obtain consent from the other party before engaging in sexual activity. Factors to be considered include whether the person knew, or whether a reasonable person in the accused’s position should have known, that the victim did not give, or revoked, consent; was incapacitated; or was otherwise incapable of giving consent.

• Sexual intercourse with a minor is never consensual when the victim is under 18 years old, because the victim is considered incapable of giving legal consent due to age.

Domestic Violence is a form of Sexual Violence and is abuse committed against someone who is a current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, someone with whom the abuser has a child, someone with whom the abuser has or had a dating or engagement relationship, or a person similarly situated under California domestic or family violence law. Cohabitant means two unrelated persons living together for a substantial period of time, resulting in some permanency of relationship.  Factors that may determine whether persons are cohabiting include, but are not limited to (1) sexual relations between the parties while sharing the same living quarters, (2) sharing of income or expenses, (3) joint use or ownership of property, (4) whether the parties hold themselves out as husband and wife, (5) the continuity of the relationship, and (6) the length of the relationship.

Dating Violence is a form of Sexual Violence, and is abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social or dating relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. This may include someone the victim just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website.

Stalking means a repeated course of conduct directed at a specific person (when based on gender or sex) that places that person in reasonable fear for his/her or others’ safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress. Applicable CA Penal Code for Stalking 646.9.

Assistance for Victims: Protective Orders/Measures

Regardless of whether a victim elects to pursue a criminal complaint or whether the offense is alleged to have occurred on or off campus, the university will assist victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and will provide each victim with a written explanation of their rights. CSUDH’s customized “Rights and Options for Victims of Sexual Violence, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking as set forth by Attachment C of California State University EO 1095.

In California, a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking has the following rights: to be treated with fairness and respect for his or her privacy and dignity, and to be free from intimidation, harassment, and abuse throughout the criminal or juvenile justice process and to be reasonably protected from the defendant and persons acting on behalf of the defendant.

California State University, Dominguez Hills complies with California law in recognizing orders of protection. To obtain a restraining order you will need to go to the court and fill out the necessary paperwork. The courts can issue protective orders, also known as restraining orders, directing an abuser to stop harassing and “keep away” from a victim or the victim’s children. These orders do not guarantee the abuser will cease and desist, but they will allow law enforcement to take action to remove and/or arrest the abuser.

Once you have obtained a protective order you should: carry a copy with you at all times, keep another copy in a safe place, leave copies at places where the restrained person is ordered not to go (i.e.: your work, the school/university where you and/or your children attend). All of these domestic violence protective orders are entered into the California Statewide Domestic Violence Restraining Order Registry. Law enforcement officers throughout the state may access the Registry to determine the existence of a protective order and enforce it.

Any person who obtains an order of protection form California or any reciprocal state should provide a copy to the University Police and the Office of the Title IX Coordinator. A complainant may then meet with a Detective from the University Police Services to develop a Personal Safety Plan, which is a plan for University Police and the victim to reduce risk of harm while on campus or coming and going from campus. This plan may include, but not limited to: escorts, alternate housing, special parking arrangements, changing classroom locations or allowing students to complete assignments from home, etc.

To the extent of the victim's cooperation and consent, university offices, including the Office of Student Affairs, Title IX Coordinator, and University Police will work cooperatively to ensure that the complainant's health, physical safety, work and academic status are protected, pending the outcome of a formal university investigation of the complaint. For example, if reasonably available, the Office of Student Affairs may offer to assist a complainant with changes to academic, living, transportation or working situations in addition to counseling, health services, visa and immigration assistance, and assistance in notifying appropriate local law enforcement. The victim may opt to decline to notify authorities. Additionally, personal identifiable information about the victim will be treated as confidential and only shared with persons with a specific need to know who are investigating/adjudicating the complaint or delivering resources or support services to the complainant (for example, publicly available record-keeping for purposes of Clery Act reporting and disclosures will be made without inclusion of identifying information of about the victim, as defined in 42 USC 1395(a) (20).) Further, the university will maintain as confidential, any accommodations or protective measures provided to the victim to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the institution to provide the accommodations or protective measures.

The University Police does not publish the name of crime victims nor residence identifiable information regarding victims in the Daily Crime Log or online. Victims may request that campus directory information on file be removed from public sources by request through the Information Technology

How to be an Active Bystander

Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. They are “individuals who observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. They are not directly involved but have the choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it. We want to promote a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm. We may not always know what to do even if we want to help. Below is a list of some ways to be an active bystander.. If you or someone else is in immediate danger, dial 911. This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards another and it is not safe for you to interrupt.

• Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are ok.

• Confront people who seclude, hit on, try to make out with, or have sex with people who are incapacitated.

• Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person.

• Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.

• Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, or with legal assistance.

Risk Reduction

With no intent to victim blame and recognizing that only rapists are responsible for rape, the following are some strategies to reduce one’s risk of sexual assault or harassment (taken from Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network, www.rainn.org):

Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way to get out of a bad situation.

• Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one is around. • Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.

Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably isn’t the best place to be.

Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more vulnerable.

Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.

Don't allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.

Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.

When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with each other throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.

Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.).

Don't leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If you’ve left your drink alone, just get a new one.

Don't accept drinks from people you don't know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties, don’t drink from the punch bowls or other large, common open containers.

Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get him or her to a safe place immediately.

If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.). Be explicit with doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).

• If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can try:

Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything wrong, it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.

Be true to yourself. Don't feel obligated to do anything you don't want to do. "I don't want to" is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.

Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with knowing. Your friends or family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for you to leave.

Lie. If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.

Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the doors? Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?

If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.

The Importance of Preserving Evidence

It is important to take steps to preserve and collect evidence; doing so preserves the full range of options available to victims, be it through the university’s administrative complaint procedures or criminal prosecution. To preserve evidence: (1) do not wash your face or hands; (2) do not shower or bathe; (3) do not brush your teeth; (4) do not change clothes or straighten up the area where the assault took place: (5) do not dispose of clothes or other items that were present during the assault, or use the restroom; and (6) seek a medical exam immediately. If you already cleaned up from the assault, you can still report the crime, as well as seek medical or counseling treatment. You may consult with the campus Title IX Coordinator or a local sexual assault victim resource center for assistance as well.

Reporting Options and Confidentiality

The University encourages victims of Sexual Violence, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, or Stalking (collectively Sexual Violence) to talk to someone about what happened – so they can get the support they need, and so the University can respond appropriately. Whether – and the extent to which – a University employee may agree to maintain confidentiality (and not disclose information to the Title IX Coordinator) depends on the employee’s position and responsibilities at the University. The following information is intended to make victims aware of the various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to them – so they can make informed choices about where to turn for help. The University strongly encourages victims to talk to someone identified in one or more of these groups.

Certain University employees, listed below, are required by law to maintain near or complete confidentiality; talking to them is sometimes called a ’privileged communication.’ University law enforcement employees may maintain the victim’s identity as confidential, if requested by the victim, but will report the facts of the incident to the Title IX Coordinator, including the identity of the perpetrator. Most other University employees are required to report all details of a Sexual Violence incident (including the identities of both the victim and alleged perpetrator) to the Title IX Coordinator so the University can take immediate action to protect the victim, and take steps to correct and eliminate the cause of Sexual Violence. University Police, the Title IX Coordinator, University-employed physicians, professional counselors, sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates, and certain other University employees are required to explain to victims their rights and options with respect to confidentiality.

Privileged and Confidential Communications

Physicians, Psychotherapists, Professional Counselors and Clergy – Physicians, psychotherapists, professional, licensed counselors, and clergy who work or volunteer on or off campus, and who provide medical or mental health treatment or counseling (including those who act in that role under their supervision) may not report any information about an incident of Sexual Violence to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator, without the victim’s consent. A victim can seek assistance and support from physicians, psychotherapists, professional, licensed counselors, and clergy without triggering a University investigation that could reveal the victim’s identity or the fact of the victim’s disclosure. However, see limited exceptions below regarding when health care practitioners must report to local law enforcement agencies. Health care practitioners should explain these limited exceptions to victims, if applicable.

Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Counselors and Advocates

Sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates who work or volunteer on or off campus in sexual assault centers, victim advocacy offices, women’s centers, and health centers (including all individuals who work or volunteer in these centers and offices, as well as non-professional counselors or advocates, and those who act in that role under their supervision) may talk to a victim without revealing any information about the victim and the incident of Sexual Violence to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator, without the victim’s consent. A victim can seek assistance and support from these counselors and advocates without triggering a University investigation that could reveal his/her identity or that a victim disclosed an incident to them. However, see limited exceptions below regarding when sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates must report to local law enforcement agencies. Counselors and advocates should explain these limited exceptions to victims, if applicable.

The University will be unable to conduct an investigation into a particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against a perpetrator if a victim chooses to (1) speak only to a physician, professional counselor, clergy member, sexual assault counselor, domestic violence counselor or advocate; and (2) maintain complete confidentiality. Even so, these individuals will assist victims in receiving other necessary protection and support, such as victim advocacy, disability, medical/health or mental health services, or legal services, and will advise victims regarding their right to file a Title IX complaint with the University and a separate complaint with local or University police. If a victim insists on confidentiality, such professionals, counselors and advocates will likely not be able to assist the victim with: University academic support or accommodations; changes to University-based living or working schedules; or adjustments to course schedules. A victim who at first requests confidentiality may later decide to file a complaint with the University or report the incident to the police, and thus have the incident fully investigated. These counselors and advocates can provide victims with that assistance if requested by the victim. These counselors and advocates will also explain that Title IX includes protections against retaliation, and that the University will not only take steps to prevent retaliation when it knows or reasonably should know of possible retaliation, but will also take strong responsive action if it occurs.

 EXCEPTIONS: Under California law, any health practitioner employed in a health facility, clinic, physician’s office, or local or state public health department or clinic is required to make a report to local law enforcement if he or she provides medical services for a physical condition to a patient/victim who he or she knows or reasonably suspects is suffering from (1) a wound or physical injury inflicted by a firearm; or (2) any wound or other physical injury inflicted upon a victim where the injury is the result of assaultive or abusive conduct (including Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, and Dating Violence). This exception does not apply to sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates. Health care practitioners should explain this limited exception to victims, if applicable. 

Additionally, under California law, all professionals described above (physicians, psychotherapists, professional counselors, clergy, and sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates) are mandatory child abuse and neglect reporters, and are required to report incidents involving victims under 18 years of age to local law enforcement. These professionals will explain this limited exception to victims, if applicable.

Finally, some or all of these professionals may also have reporting obligations under California law to (1) local law enforcement in cases involving threats of immediate or imminent harm to self or others where disclosure of the information is necessary to prevent the threatened danger; or (2) to the court if compelled by court order or subpoena in a criminal proceeding related to the Sexual Violence incident. If applicable, these professionals will explain this limited exception to victims.

Reporting to University or Local Police

If a victim reports to local or University Police about Sexual Violence, the police are required to notify victims that their names will become a matter of public record unless confidentiality is requested. If a victim requests that his/her identity be kept confidential, his/her name will not become a matter of public record and the police will not report the victim’s identity to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator. University Police will, however, report the facts of the incident itself to the Title IX Coordinator being sure not to reveal to the Title IX Coordinator victim names/identities or compromise their own criminal investigation. The University is required by the federal Clery Act to report certain types of crimes (including certain sex offenses) in statistical reports. However, while the University will report the type of incident in the annual crime statistics report known as the Annual Security Report, victim names/identities will not be revealed.

Reporting to the Title IX Coordinator and Other University Employees

Most University employees have a duty to report Sexual Violence incidents when they are on notice of it. When a victim tells the Title IX Coordinator or another University employee about a Sexual Violence incident, the victim has the right to expect the University to take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate what happened and to resolve the matter promptly and equitably. In all cases, the University strongly encourages victims to report Sexual Violence directly to the campus Title IX Coordinator.

As detailed above, all University employees except physicians, licensed counselors, sexual assault counselors and advocates, must report to the Title IX Coordinator all relevant details about any Sexual Violence incidents of which they become aware. The University will need to determine what happened – and will need to know the names of the victim(s) and the perpetrator(s), any witnesses, and any other relevant facts, including the date, time and specific location of the incident.

To the extent possible, information reported to the Title IX Coordinator or other University employees will be shared only with individuals responsible for handling the University’s response to the incident. The University will protect the privacy of individuals involved in a Sexual Violence incident except as otherwise required by law or University policy. A Sexual Violence report may result in the gathering of extremely sensitive information about individuals in the campus community. While such information is considered confidential, University policy regarding access to public records and disclosure of personal information may require disclosure of certain information concerning a report of sexual violence. In such cases, efforts will be made to redact the records, as appropriate, in order to protect the victim’s identity and privacy and the privacy of other involved individuals. Except as detailed in the section on Privileged and Confidential Communications above, no University employee, including the Title IX Coordinator, should disclose the victim’s identity to the police without the victim’s consent or unless the victim has also reported the incident to the police.

If a victim requests of the Title IX Coordinator or another University employee that his/her identity remain completely confidential, the Title IX Coordinator will explain that the University cannot always honor that request and guarantee complete confidentiality. If a victim wishes to remain confidential or request that no investigation be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the University must weigh that request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, employees and third parties, including the victim. Under those circumstances, the Title IX Coordinator will determine whether the victim’s request for complete confidentiality and/or no investigation can be honored under the facts and circumstances of the particular case, including whether the University has a legal obligation to report the incident, conduct an investigation or take other appropriate steps. Without information about a victim’s identity, the University’s ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the perpetrator may be severely limited.

NOTE: If the University determines that the perpetrator poses a serious and immediate threat to the campus community, a designated Campus Security Authority under the Clery Act may be called upon to issue a timely warning to the community. Any such warning will not include any information that identifies the victim.

The Title IX Coordinator will inform the victim of the initiation of an investigation prior to starting an investigation and will, to the extent possible, only share information with people responsible for handling the University’s response to the incident. The Title IX Coordinator will remain mindful of the victim’s well-being, and will take ongoing steps to protect the victim from retaliation or harm, and work with the victim to create a safety plan. Retaliation against the victim, whether by students, employees or third parties, will not be tolerated. The University and Title IX Coordinator will also:

Provide interim remedies requested by the victim, if they are reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report Sexual Violence to campus or local police;

Assist victims in accessing available victim advocacy, academic support counseling, disability, medical/health or mental health services, and legal assistance both on and off campus;

Provide security and support, which could include issuing a no-contact order, helping arrange a change of campus-based living or working arrangements or course schedules (including for the perpetrator pending the outcome of the investigation) or adjustments for assignments, tests, or work duties; and

Inform victims of their right to report a crime to University or local police – and provide victims with assistance if desired.

The University will not require a victim to participate in any investigation or disciplinary proceeding if the victim does not wish to participate.

The University will not generally notify parents or legal guardians of a Sexual Violence report unless the victim is under 18 years old or the victim provides the University with written permission to do so.

Under California law, and pursuant to University policy, all University employees, including the Title IX Coordinator, are mandatory child abuse and neglect reporters and should explain to victims under 18 years of age that they are required to report the Sexual Violence incident to the police. However, the identity of the person who reports and the report itself are confidential and disclosed only among appropriate agencies.

Because the University is under a continuing legal obligation to address the issue of Sexual Violence campus-wide, Sexual Violence reports (including non-identifying reports) may also require the University to consider broader remedial action – such as increased monitoring, supervision or security at locations where the reported Sexual Violence occurred; increased education, training and prevention efforts, including to targeted population groups; climate assessments/victimization surveys; and/or revision of policies and practices.

Resources for Reporting - Sexual Assault

Sexual assaults may be reported to any of the following agencies, which provide a variety of support options and resources. Reports may be made anonymously.

The University Police respond to all reports of sexual assault. Officers’ conduct investigations, interview victims and suspects, collect evidence, testify in court, and refer victims to the appropriate services.

Additional listing of organizations that provide assistance to sexual assault victims:

• Deborah Roberson-Simms, Interim Associate Vice President, Human Resources
Welch Hall, room A-340.
Dsimms@csudh.edu.
(310) 243-3771
Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

• Stephan J. Rice, Associate Dean of Students
Welch Hall, room A-410.
srice@csudh.edu .
(310) 243-3784
Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

• Dr. Clare Weber, Associate Vice President, Faculty Affairs
Welch Hall, room B-368.
cweber@csudh.edu .
(310) 243-3766
Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

• Women’s Resource Center
Small College Complex, room 148.
(310) 243-2486
Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

University Police

Chief Carlos Velez
Welch Hall, room B-100.
cvelez@csudh.edu.
Emergency: 911.
Non-Emergency: (310) 243-3639.

Local Police

LA County Sheriff 21356 Avalon Boulevard, Carson CA
Emergency: 911
Non-Emergency: (310) 830-1123

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights:

• (800) 421-3481 or ocr@ed.gov
• If you wish to fill out a complaint form online with the OCR, you may do so at: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/complaintintro.html

The White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault
https://www.notalone.gov/

Medical & Counseling Services |
Campus Services:

CSUDH Women's Resource Center.
http://www4.csudh.edu/wrc/index

CSUDH Student Health and Psychological Services.

http://www4.csudh.edu/shps/ 

healthcenter@csudh.edu

Off-Campus Services:

YWCA Sexual Assault Crisis Services (562) 590-6400
YWCA Harbor Area (310) 547-0831
YWCA Greater Los Angeles Area (213) 748-0135
Rape Treatment Center (310) 319-4000
Peace Over Violence (310) 392-8381
Ending Domestic Violence - Su Casa (652) 402-4888

CSU PROCEDURES FOR RESPONDING AND INVESTIGATING REPORTS OF SEXUAL DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINTS

The University has formal written procedures that provide for a campus investigation of reports of sexual discrimination, written findings sent to the accuser and the accused, and a review of the campus investigative findings by the CSU Chancellor’s Office. The procedure for CSU employees and third parties is separate from, but similar to the procedure for CSU students. Your campus Title IX Coordinator can explain these procedures in detail.

Complaint Procedures

The CSU has adopted and published complaint procedures that provide for prompt and equitable resolution of Sex Discrimination complaints, including Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking:

Complaints made by students.

Executive Order 1097, entitled "Systemwide Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation Against Students and Systemwide Procedure for Handling Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation Complaints by Students" is the appropriate systemwide procedure for all complaints of Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking made by CSU students against the CSU, a CSU employee, another CSU student, or a third party. (Executive Order 1097 is attached as XX; see also http://www.calstate.edu/EO/EO-1097.pdf

Complaints made by employees, former employees, and applicants for employment.

Executive Order 1096, entitled “Systemwide Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation Against Employees and Third Parties and Procedure for Handling Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation Allegations by Employees and Third Parties” is the appropriate systemwide procedure for all complaints of Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking made by employees and former employees against the CSU, another CSU employee, a CSU student or a third party. Employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement that provides a grievance procedure for raising allegations of Sex Discrimination or Sexual Harassment, including Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking shall use the grievance procedure specified in their collective bargaining agreement. (Executive Order 1096 is attached as XX; see also http://www.calstate.edu/EO/EO-1096.pdf

Complaints made by student-employees.

Executive Order 1096 is the appropriate systemwide procedure for all complaints of Sex Discrimination, including Sexual Harassment or Sexual Violence, made by student-employees where the alleged Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking arose out of the person’s status as an employee and not his/her status as a student. (Executive Order 1096 is attached as XXXX; see also http://www.calstate.edu/EO/EO-1096.pdf

Complaints made by third parties.

Executive Order 1096 is the appropriate systemwide procedure for all complaints of Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking filed by third parties against the CSU, a CSU employee or a CSU student. (Executive Order 1096 is attached as XXXX; see also http://www.calstate.edu/EO/EO-1096.pdf

Regardless of whether an employee, a student or a third party ultimately files a complaint under the applicable complaint procedure, if a campus knows or has reason to know about possible Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking, it must review the matter to determine if an investigation is warranted. When warranted, all such investigations must be prompt, thorough, and impartial. The campus must then take appropriate steps to eliminate the Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, Dating Violence, and/or Stalking, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects.

CONVICTED SEXUAL OFFENDER REGISTRATION LAWS

Effective October 28, 2002, Penal Code 290.1 was expanded and requires sexual offenders to register with the University Police. convicted sexual offenders are required to register under Section 290 if they are residing on the university campus; enrolled as a student of the university; employed by the university, either full-time or part-time (includes paid employees or volunteers); or working or carrying on a vocation at the university (e.g. contractors) for more than 14 days or for an aggregate period exceeding 30 days in a calendar year (including paid workers as well as volunteers).

Persons listed above must register with the University Police within five working days of commencing enrollment or employment with the University. Registrants are also required to notify the University Police within five working days of ceasing to be enrolled or employed, or ceasing to carry on a vocation at the University.

MEGAN’S LAW

In 1996, California enacted Megan's Law, which provides the public with photographs and descriptive information on serious sex offenders that reside in California. These offenders have been convicted of committing sex crimes and are required to register their whereabouts with local law enforcement. The Department of Justice (DOJ) has made this database of sex registrant information available for public viewing.

You can access this information through the Los Angeles County Sheriff Department - Carson Station, located at 21356 S. Avalon Blvd. (310) 830-1123 between 8am-5pm (daily) or by contacting the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction over the city that you reside. Viewing of the Megan's Law information is limited to 15 minutes and copies of these records are not permitted.

To access sex offender information via telephone, you may call the Sex Offender Identification Line at 1-900-448-3000. The cost is a flat rate of $10.00 for information on up to two individuals.

For more information on Megan's Law please see the California Department of Justice website

COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

The University Police work closely with the Department of Student Health & Psychological Services and the Department of Student Development. We work as a team in dealing with sensitive situations, and we refer persons to psychological counseling as needed. The psychologists inform their clients that they can report crimes to the University Police. Counseling sessions are considered privileged. Crime information can be forwarded anonymously at the request of the client. The psychologists do not disclose information to the University Police without the consent of the client, unless there is an immediate threat to safety. Any reporting of statistics to comply with this act is done by reporting numbers and not names so the information provided by clients is confidential.

Psychological counseling services are available to students at no cost. The staff consists of licensed psychologists and professionally trained mental health specialists. Psychologists are also available for consultations regarding distressed or potentially violent students and can be reached at 243-3818.

EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (EAP)

Integrated Insights Employee Assistance Program is a confidential counseling and referral service to help employees and their family members deal with life's daily challenges. The EAP offers easy access to help 24 hours a day, seven days a week via a toll-free number (800) 342-8111 or (858) 571-1698. Sessions are face to face counseling sessions at an office convenient to home or work. Employee assistance counselors are licensed clinical social workers; marriage, family and child counselors; and clinical psychologists with special training. EAP is there to help with anything that interferes with job or personal life, including: marital/relationship issues, substance abuse, anxiety, depression, anger, legal questions, financial issues, coping with change, bereavement or grief, and low self-esteem. For additional information about the EAP, please visit the Human Resources Management website.

HATE CRIMES

Hate violence as defined in the statute "means any act of physical intimidation or physical harassment, physical force or physical violence, or the threat of physical force or physical violence, that is directed against any person or group of persons because of the actual or perceived ethnicity, race, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, or political/religious beliefs of that person or group." Incidents of hate violence can be reported to the University Police, Student Health & Psychological Services, Student Development, or Vice President for Student Affairs Office. The University does not condone hate violence and is charged with ensuring that the rights guaranteed by state law and the U.S. Constitution are protected for all people regardless of their ethnicity, race, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, or political/religious beliefs.

CSUDH GRADUATION RATES

Under the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy Crimes Statistics Act, institutions of higher education are required to disclose information to prospective and current students about institution graduation rates for first-time freshmen. The California State University draws its first time freshmen from the top one-third of California’s high school graduates. Since 1960, the CSU has awarded more than 1.2 million baccalaureate degrees in hundreds of program areas. More than any other senior institution in California, the CSU has maintained access for students who need to juggle academic life with work and family obligations. The rate of graduation will vary depending upon the needs of the individual student to balance work, school and family priorities. Information specific to California State University Dominguez Hills; graduation rates appears below.

The California State University, Dominguez Hills colleges
Academic Roadmaps, the list of bachelors and masters degrees
• Most recent number of degrees awarded
Graduation rates/retention